GREETINGS & Leabhar na hAiseirghe

Posted by Bea Cloke on Monday Jun 6, 2016 Under Composition, Leabhar na hAiseirghe, Music

Leabhar na hAiséirghe (Book of the Resurrection) is an astonishing artefact, housed in the National Museum of Ireland (Collins Barracks in Dublin). Its creator, Art O’Murnaghan, is recognised as the greatest Artist-Scribe of 20th Century Ireland.

The recent RTÉ Raidió na Gaeltachta programme Art Ó Mornacháin agus Leabhar na hAiséirghe previews the first new music you have heard from his great-grandson in some time: a glimpse at Daniel’s soon to be unveiled ‘supergroup’: GREETINGS. Their “handsinmyhead” is described as an intoxication in 3 parts. This excerpt (Part 3) features Gerry Leonard  on electric guitar and Daniel on 12 string acoustic.

Recorded at Kettle Watch minor, Pussycat Row, and The Surgery
Produced by DF
Engineared by Paddy Hunt

The Power of the Rising...

The Proclaiming a Republic: the 1916 Rising exhibition at the National Museum of Ireland, Collins Barracks, contains a section dedicated to Art Ó Murnaghan and his creation of Leabhar na hAiséirghe / Book of the Resurrection.

RTÉ Raidió na Gaeltachta The National Museum of Ireland

Tags : | Comments Off on GREETINGS & Leabhar na hAiseirghe

Abstract Analogue reviews On The Nature Of Electricity & Acoustics

Posted by Bea Cloke on Monday Sep 1, 2014 Under Album, Music

On The Nature Of Electricity & Acoustics

Stephen Rennicks enthusiastically reviews On The Nature of Electricity & Acoustics on his website Abstract Analogue:

“On The Nature of Electricity & Acoustics is a CD and download compilation (curated by composer and artist Daniel Figgis) of various Irish electro-acoustic artists which came out last year. If you have any interest in this type of music, then this album is a perfect introduction and in fact is the only one of its type that I’m aware of. Thankfully Figgis knows his stuff in this department.

Electronic maverick Roger Doyle’s playful ‘Baby Grand’ from 1978 opens the album in a minimal fashion with programmed over-lapping piano runs and he returns again about the midway point under his Operating Theatre guise in a piano and electronics piece from 1982.

Deep Burial’s deeply narcotic ‘Glue Bag Lung’ is another standout track for me and comes just before Ian Wilson’s deeply moving and melancholic ‘Devotional 3’ which places violin on a bed of electronics. Pat Daly’s ‘Com-Plex’ reminds me of and could be seen to be responding to Roger Doyle’s opening piece in its arrangement and playfulness. Very engaging indeed.

It’s great to finally get to hear something by Vincent Doherty. I previously only knew of him as a longtime collaborator of Daniel Figgis. His ‘Snow din’ is a lovely way to spend 2 minutes of your time, as you add him to your list of artists from this collection to make an effort to hear more from. Like a number of the other artists here, Doherty works outside of the conventional context of a musician that plays live, releases albums etc, working as a composer and sound designer for theatre and radio.

Cathal Coughlan’s ‘Second City Bicycle Bounce’ (a “recomposition” of music by Daniel Figgis) is a curious instrumental from 2002 that keeps growing on me each time I hear it. He’s managed to weave some fairly unusual elements together that somehow continue to reveal new angles and sides to them you might not have heard at first listen.

The gtr/bass/drums of ‘Devilcock!’ by Princess Tinymeat announces the first and only rock out so far. An early Figgis project from 1986 it makes me want to hear more of their music for sure. The track sounds on the verge of crashing to a halt or spinning off to one side, which is not a bad thing in this case. A welcome unreleased instrumental track from Schroeder’s Cat, “Goodbye”, commissioned by Figgis for his “poisonhats” event, is the penultimate track before ‘Lucky’s Bad Day’ from Figgis’ Skipper (1994). This is still one of my all time favourite albums and this track still sounds so bright, so full of wonder and potential, and after so much time I expect it always will. A return to the familiar so, after an illuminating and thrilling journey in the company of artists who have long been pursuing and honing their own unique vision.”

Buy the iTunes release of On The Nature Of Electricity & Acoustics (features 12 additional tracks)
Buy the On The Nature Of Electricity & Acoustics CD

Tags : | Comments Off on Abstract Analogue reviews On The Nature Of Electricity & Acoustics

Back in theatreland with Foreign Bodies

Posted by Bea Cloke on Sunday Jul 7, 2013 Under Music, Theatre

Daniel has written the score for Polish Theatre Ireland‘s play Foreign Bodies which opens in Project Arts Centre on 24 July.

Inspired by a true story, Foreign Bodies is the story of Adam, a member of the Solidarność (Solidarity) movement, who, after the political crisis of 1989, has a male-to-female sex change operation and becomes Ewa. As Ewa, she immediately has to struggle with the poverty, solitude and social rejection in a new capitalist country.

Performance information and tickets

24 July – 3 August ~ Tickets €14/12

Buy tickets from Project Arts Centre

 

Tags : | Comments Off on Back in theatreland with Foreign Bodies

OTN … update

Posted by Bea Cloke on Sunday Jun 30, 2013 Under Album, Music

Q2 Album Of The Week
On the Nature of Electricity & Acoustics is a somewhat disjunct thrill-ride of a listen. But that’s the point. Few listeners outside of Ireland’s academic or underground scenes will have heard this music, but as the compilation proves, it’s a rich and diverse world worth visiting.
Hannis Brown, Q2 MUSIC

… a pleasingly varied showcase… which combines the virtues of discipline and diversity. The music is for the most part (surprisingly?) euphonious… (and who wouldn’t want to hear a band called Princess Tinymeat?)…
Roger Thomas, INTERNATIONAL RECORD REVIEW

mind-bending twists and turns… in the presence of (a) tradition whose indelible spirit penetrates through time, technologies and trends.
Wendalyn Bartley, theWHOLENOTE

… pieces dip and weave, refusing to be pinned down; the listener must come to the music, rather than the other way around.
IRISH INDEPENDENT

A fascinating anthology… excellently curated by Daniel Figgis
BP Fallon

Tags : | Comments Off on OTN … update

On The Nature Of Electricity & Acoustics released today

Posted by Bea Cloke on Tuesday Mar 26, 2013 Under Album, Music

Daniel has curated an extensive anthology of Electro-Acoustic music from Ireland. We are proud to announce its arrival in the world. On The Nature Of Electricity & Acoustics (Various Artists) receives its international release today.

The iTunes special edition features an extra 12 tracks, making 35 in all!

Visit Heresy Records for the full track listing and purchase details: http://heresyrecords.com/on-the-nature-of-electricity-and-acoustics.

Some comments so far …

This album is a wake up call for the senses… impossible to pigeonhole or classify.
Winifried Dulisch, AUDIO MAGAZIN, Germany

Irish electro-acoustic music has developed from the academic pursuit of pointy/beardy types into something that lives, breathes and makes sense. These are clever, cogent dispatches from the fringes… See you on the other side?
Tony Clayton-Lea, THE IRISH TIMES

On The Nature Of Electricity & Acoustics: what an album! So much diversity and energy. A veritable smorgasbord.
@NiallCrumlish

CD OF THE MONTH
Contemporary Music Centre, Ireland

From the delicate works of Dennehy and Wilson through to the post-punk furore of Figgis’ own Princess Tinymeat, there is presumably something for everyone – a wide-ranging and intelligent overview of outsider electronic music in Ireland.
As an introduction to the work of a diverse group of artists and composers, On The Nature Of Electricity & Acoustics is unparalleled…
Ian Maleney, THE QUIETUS

… it is wildly ambitious, incredible, fantastic … magnificent and illuminating
Stephen McCauley, BBC RADIO ULSTER

Have a listen. I’m glad to be part of it.
Roger Doyle on Facebook

Tags : | Comments Off on On The Nature Of Electricity & Acoustics released today

Benjamin Franklin Drawing Electricity from the Sky

Posted by Bea Cloke on Wednesday Mar 13, 2013 Under Album
painting for sleeve image

Benjamin West (1816)

 

Tags : | Comments Off on Benjamin Franklin Drawing Electricity from the Sky

CITY HALL – Propers

Posted by Bea Cloke on Sunday Feb 10, 2013 Under Live events

Photo by Barney

Thanks to everyone who came along and participated – last weekend was a great success! And thanks to everyone who worked on the show.

Production

Daniel Figgis – Event Concept, Director, Sound Provisions
Darren McCreesh – Event Manager, PR
Paddy Hunt – Studio Engineer
Evin Doyle – Live Sound Engineer
Rob Mather – Live Sound Engineer
Tim Redfern – Technical Consultant
Gareth Jones – Graphic Design
Dearbhla McCreesh – Event Door

‘Ghost’ Musicians

Áine Ní Dhubhghaill – harp
Arun Rao – cello
Beau Gantry – trombone
Daniel Figgis – bicycle horn/electric guitar & brass quintet process/harmonium/piano/string & choral simulacra
Deirdre O’Leary – clarinet
Ionetta Kresta Lins – flute
Ktho Zoid – electric guitar/laptop
Malachy Robinson – double bass
Vonnie Pocket – oboe

Dublin City Council

Ray Yeates – Dublin City Arts Officer
Ruairí Ó Cuív – Public Art Manager
Ken Hall – Dublin City Hall Manager
Karen Bannon – Dublin City Hall Events Manager
Additional thanks to Padraig Lynam, Mary McCann, Mary Weir, Denise Buckley, Brian King & John Butler

And a Big Thank You to Imelda Dervan at the Arts Council and Brian Crowley at the Pearse Museum.

arts council logo dublin city council logo

Tags : | Comments Off on CITY HALL – Propers

CITY HALL Day Three

Posted by Bea Cloke on Sunday Feb 3, 2013 Under Live events

arts council logo dublin city council logo

Tags : | Comments Off on CITY HALL Day Three

CITY HALL Day Two

Posted by Bea Cloke on Saturday Feb 2, 2013 Under Live events

arts council logo dublin city council logo

Tags : | Comments Off on CITY HALL Day Two

CITY HALL Day One

Posted by Bea Cloke on Friday Feb 1, 2013 Under Live events

arts council logo dublin city council logo

Tags : | Comments Off on CITY HALL Day One